Why Was The Neutral Ground Agreement Established

Neutral soil. The Neutral Quarter along the U.S. border with Spanish Texas was created as a place where the military of both countries would engage. After the purchase of Louisiana in 1803, the United States and Spain were unable to agree on the Louisiana-Texas border. The “Neutral Strip,” sometimes referred to as no man`s land or neutral ground, was a controversial area between Spanish Texas and the newly American territory of Louisiana. In October 1806, American forces and the decline of the Spanish Empire clashed on the other side of the Sabine River. To avoid war, General James Wilkinson, who commanded U.S. forces, and Lieutenant-Colonel Simin de Herrera, commander for Spain, reached a temporary compromise known as the “neutral ground agreement.” If Herrera kept the Spanish troops west of Sabine, Wilkinson would withdraw American troops east of the traditional Franco-Spanish border. The two men formalized in writing the establishment of the neutral band and agreed that neither government would attempt to assert sovereignty over the territory, send troops to the neutral zone or allow the entry of someone (who is not already resident) until international diplomacy presents a definitive solution to the border issue. In fact, neutral land existed outside the government of the United States or Spain until 1821. And who got the neutral agreement on soils? On November 5, 1806, to avoid an armed confrontation, General James Wilkinson and Lieutenant-Colonel Simin de Herrera, the American and Spanish military commander, reached an agreement that made the disputed area neutral ground. After Louisiana Purchase, the United States and Spain failed to agree on the Louisiana-Texas border.

The Neutral Terrain, also known as the “Neutral Strip”, “neutral”,[1] of the Rio Hondo Strip[2], no Man`s Land of Louisiana, Sabine Free State, Bastard State[3], Stinking Hell[3] and Devil`s Playground [3] – has become a controversial area between Spanish Texas and the new Louisiana Purchase.